Daily Devotionals: (June 26th): Prayer for the Hearing of God’s Voice

by Aaron Dunlop

Reading: “Speak, LORD; for thy servant heareth.”—1 Samuel 3:9

O God, I desire this morning to approach with lowly reverence the footstool of Your throne, adoring and praising You for the rest of the past night and the comforts and blessings of a new day. O holy, blessed, eternal Trinity, three persons, one God, have mercy upon me, and grant me Your blessing.

Most blessed Spirit of all grace, more especially would I at this time invoke Your presence and nearness. I acknowledge, with shame and confusion of face, how often I have grieved You by resisting Your gracious influences. How often have You pleaded with me by the voice of Providence, and yet I have turned a deaf ear to Your repeated warnings and remonstrance!

You have spoken to me in prosperity, when the full cup demanded in return a heart full of gratitude. You have spoken to me in adversity, when, by the emptied cup and the broken cistern, You would have driven me from all earthly things, to the everlasting God Himself, as my only satisfying portion.

Lord, Your voice is continually heard in my conscience. You have spoken to me by the terrors of the law and by the tender accents of gospel love, and yet I have continued to “spend my money for that which is not bread, and my labor for that which satisfies not.” Long before now I might have exhausted Your patience. “It is of the Lord’s mercies I am not consumed.”

Help me, Lord, to hear, and when I hear to answer obediently with diligence and haste, for Jesus sake, Amen.

Adapted from the Rev. John McDuff, D.D., The Morning Watches, 1852.

John Ross Macduff was born at Bonhard, near Perth, on May 23, 1818. After studying at the University of Edinburgh, he became parish minister of Kettins, Forfarshire,  in 1842. In 1849 he moved to St. Madoes, Perthshire, and in 1855 to Sandyford, Glasgow. He received the degree of D.D. from the University of Glasgow in 1862, and from the University of New York about the same time. He retired from pastoral work in 1871, moved to Chislehurst, Kent where he died in 1887.

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