Daily Devotionals: (April 21st) Faith Confirmed in the Resurrection

by Aaron Dunlop

Reading: “And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.” Romans 1:4

August and convincing as had been all the previous attestations of His Godhead—His life one succession of the most astonishing and brilliant achievements of Divine power and goodness—diseases healed, sight restored, demons ejected, the dead raised, tempests hushed, and winds stilled—His death marked by prodigies of terrible and surpassing wonder and sublimity—the earth heaving beneath His feet, the sun darkening above Him, the graves opening around Him—yet never had His Godhead shone forth with such demonstrative power and resplendent glory, as when He broke forth from the tomb, and rose triumphant over hell, death, and the grave.

Then did He fulfill this prediction—“Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it again.” Receding for a while from communion with life, He disappeared within the very domain of the “king of terrors,” wrapped around Him its shroud and darkness, and laid Himself down. But He rose again; bursting from the cold embrace, and awaking from the mysterious slumber, He came back to life all radiant, immortal, and divine!

Saint of God, do you want further and stronger evidence that your faith has credited no cunningly devised fable, that He to whom you have committed your precious soul is able to keep it until the morning of our own resurrection-glory? Behold it in the risen life of the incarnate God! He has come up from the grave, to make good all His previous claims to deity, thus to encourage and confirm your belief in the truth, dignity, and glory of His person, and to assure you that he that “believes in Him shall not be ashamed.” Say with Paul, believer, “I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to keep that which I have committed unto Him against that day.”

“We cannot always trace God’s hand, but we can always trust God’s heart.”—C. H. Spurgeon

Adapted from Octavius Winslow

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