September 14, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (14th Sept.) Meditations on the Fall of Peter

by Aaron Dunlop

Tempted and Then Accused by Satan

daily-devotionals

Is the nature of women more inquisitive or more malignant, that amongst so many other servants a woman should begin the second accusation? The devil will double a weak temptation, if it has proved prosperous. The first maid tempted Peter by questioning him, the second by accusing him to the other servants. Those who are apt to tempt are apt to accuse; these are the devil’s two instruments as he works the ruin of mankind. He first tempts a man to sin and then accuses him before God. He is both the tempter and the accuser (Revelation 12:10).

After he has tempted a man to sin he then accuses him to the brethren without and his own conscience within. Brethren, when you feel an assault, begin also to feel the accusation and learn to prevent the devil’s malice by resisting the temptation.

Dr. Edward Reynolds was born in 1599 in Southampton, England. He received his BA degree at Oxford in 1618. In 1622, before studying for his masters, Reynolds became a chaplain to the king and preacher at Lincoln’s Inn, London. The puritanical inclinations of Dr. Reynolds were well known; his character of piety and decorum were evident even in his college years. Edward Reynolds is known as the Bishop of Norfolk, but he was bishop for only the final fifteen years of his life and ministry. Prior to that he was the rector of Braunston, Northamptonshire, for almost thirty years. Although Reynolds was a Presbyterian by conviction, he had a reputation of moderation in his church polity. This was evidenced in his role in the Westminster Assembly. He was the only member to sit on all three of the major committees on the Confession of Faith, and with his moderate spirit provided balance in the discussions.
These devotions are taken from the works of Edward Reynolds. They have been edited for thinkgospel.com. © 2013 thinkgospel.

September 13, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (13th Sept.) Meditations on the Fall of Peter

by Aaron Dunlop

Sin and the Fear in Sin

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Peter has no sooner denied his master, but he goes out further from him. The action of the foot bears witness to the apostasy of the tongue. But why should Peter leave for fear of further examination, having already cleared himself and satisfied his examiners?

There is no security to be expected from denying the Lord. If Peter thought to find ease and safety by denying Christ, he soon discovered that he was more fearful than before. Peter tried to escape from the hands of men by running into the wrath of God. He who hides from danger in the hedge of wickedness will meet with the serpent instead of safety. Peter left the fireside company because he became suspicious of their fury and persecution. He sat boldly among them while he was in danger, but he has no sooner made his apology and he goes out into the porch.

The same fear that befell Peter here in denying his Saviour, befell Adam in the garden after denying his Maker. The next thing we read of them is their fear and flight (Genesis 3:10; cf. Matthew 26:71).

Dr. Edward Reynolds was born in 1599 in Southampton, England. He received his BA degree at Oxford in 1618. In 1622, before studying for his masters, Reynolds became a chaplain to the king and preacher at Lincoln’s Inn, London. The puritanical inclinations of Dr. Reynolds were well known; his character of piety and decorum were evident even in his college years. Edward Reynolds is known as the Bishop of Norfolk, but he was bishop for only the final fifteen years of his life and ministry. Prior to that he was the rector of Braunston, Northamptonshire, for almost thirty years. Although Reynolds was a Presbyterian by conviction, he had a reputation of moderation in his church polity. This was evidenced in his role in the Westminster Assembly. He was the only member to sit on all three of the major committees on the Confession of Faith, and with his moderate spirit provided balance in the discussions.
These devotions are taken from the works of Edward Reynolds. They have been edited for thinkgospel.com. © 2013 thinkgospel.

September 12, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (12th Sept.) Meditations on the Fall of Peter

by Aaron Dunlop

Sinners: Satan’s Servants

daily-devotionals

Woman was the first sinner (Genesis 3:6, 12), and we see in the two greatest falls, Adam’s and Peter’s, woman is made the first tempter. In this we see that the sinner is the slave of the devil to serve him. Satan uses sinners as tempters.

Dr. Edward Reynolds was born in 1599 in Southampton, England. He received his BA degree at Oxford in 1618. In 1622, before studying for his masters, Reynolds became a chaplain to the king and preacher at Lincoln’s Inn, London. The puritanical inclinations of Dr. Reynolds were well known; his character of piety and decorum were evident even in his college years. Edward Reynolds is known as the Bishop of Norfolk, but he was bishop for only the final fifteen years of his life and ministry. Prior to that he was the rector of Braunston, Northamptonshire, for almost thirty years. Although Reynolds was a Presbyterian by conviction, he had a reputation of moderation in his church polity. This was evidenced in his role in the Westminster Assembly. He was the only member to sit on all three of the major committees on the Confession of Faith, and with his moderate spirit provided balance in the discussions.
These devotions are taken from the works of Edward Reynolds. They have been edited for thinkgospel.com. © 2013 thinkgospel.

September 11, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (11th Sept.) Meditations on the Fall of Peter

by Aaron Dunlop

The Power of Satan’s Weak Instruments

daily-devotionalsI have never read of more dangerous falls in the saints than were Adam’s, Lot’s, Samson’s, David’s, Solomon’s, and Peter’s, and in all of these, either the first enticers or the first occasioners are women. A weak creature may be a strong tempter. There is nothing too impotent or useless for the devil’s service.

We know it is the pride of Satan to imitate God. As God magnifies His power in bringing strength out of weakness, so also the devil labours to gain the glory over a strong enemy with the temptation of the weaker sex (1 Peter 3:7). The purpose of the devil’s assault is the despair of his enemy. He gets Judas to betray his master that he may after get him to hang himself, and he had the same intent in Peter’s denial. What is there so suited to drive a man to despair than an apprehension of the greatness of his sin? And what could more aggravate this sin than the fact that it was the voice of a maid that proved to be stronger than his faith in Jesus to sustain him? The devil tempts us that he may draw us into sin; but he tempts us with weak instruments that he may drive us to despair.

Dr. Edward Reynolds was born in 1599 in Southampton, England. He received his BA degree at Oxford in 1618. In 1622, before studying for his masters, Reynolds became a chaplain to the king and preacher at Lincoln’s Inn, London. The puritanical inclinations of Dr. Reynolds were well known; his character of piety and decorum were evident even in his college years. Edward Reynolds is known as the Bishop of Norfolk, but he was bishop for only the final fifteen years of his life and ministry. Prior to that he was the rector of Braunston, Northamptonshire, for almost thirty years. Although Reynolds was a Presbyterian by conviction, he had a reputation of moderation in his church polity. This was evidenced in his role in the Westminster Assembly. He was the only member to sit on all three of the major committees on the Confession of Faith, and with his moderate spirit provided balance in the discussions.
These devotions are taken from the works of Edward Reynolds. They have been edited for thinkgospel.com. © 2013 thinkgospel.

September 10, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (10th Sept.) Meditations on the Fall of Peter

by Aaron Dunlop

Giving Satan the Advantage

daily-devotionalsIt is no wonder that Peter is tempted to forsake his master when he is following afar off. How can he do anything else but stumble and fall if he hides himself from the Sun of Righteousness, and is absent from the light of the world? How can he not fail and fall if he wanders out of the way of life, goes beyond the voice of the Word of Truth which alone can direct and lead and instruct in holiness and security?

He who testifies his faith by following and yet reveals his flesh and weakness by following afar off shall be sure to meet with such an enemy as hates his faith and takes advantage of his weakness. Our faith provokes him to enmity and our weakness invites him to assault. If Peter had remained in the company of Christ, Satan would not have dared to tempt him into a triple denial in the presence of such power. Or if Satan would have been so impudent, or so adventurous as to throw at Peter such temptations in the presence of his Maker, yet we know Peter would have been directed with more light, and assisted with greater strength to resist such an assault.

But Peter had left the company of his Maker! We know the devil never overcomes any who is not first overcome by self. What danger is there in fighting where there is no danger in falling? Or what difference is there between an unopposed security and an assaulted strength, except that the strength is more glorious and the security is more safe. He is not far from Satan’s temptations who is afar off from Christ’s presence and assistance. There is none nearer the fury of a strong and bloody malice, than a weak and struggling Christian.

Dr. Edward Reynolds was born in 1599 in Southampton, England. He received his BA degree at Oxford in 1618. In 1622, before studying for his masters, Reynolds became a chaplain to the king and preacher at Lincoln’s Inn, London. The puritanical inclinations of Dr. Reynolds were well known; his character of piety and decorum were evident even in his college years. Edward Reynolds is known as the Bishop of Norfolk, but he was bishop for only the final fifteen years of his life and ministry. Prior to that he was the rector of Braunston, Northamptonshire, for almost thirty years. Although Reynolds was a Presbyterian by conviction, he had a reputation of moderation in his church polity. This was evidenced in his role in the Westminster Assembly. He was the only member to sit on all three of the major committees on the Confession of Faith, and with his moderate spirit provided balance in the discussions.

These devotions are taken from the works of Edward Reynolds. They have been edited for thinkgospel.com. © 2013 thinkgospel.


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