Posts tagged ‘burial’

April 4, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (April 4th): Christ’s Burial a Church Burial

by Aaron Dunlop

 

daily-devotionalsReading: “And after this Joseph of Arimathaea, being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, besought Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus: and Pilate gave him leave. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus.” John 19:38

And with their eyes fixed on the crucified Christ, a small group of dazed, orphaned, and blinded children crept towards Him whom they had loved, “to pay Him their last respects.” That is the way it is often put, and that is exactly the way it was meant here. To pay respect—the last respect. The friends came together in God’s name for the burial.

The scene was opened by a certain Joseph of Arimathea. It is a mark of the Gospels that figures held in reserve all of a sudden make their appearance. When this happens, people may say: Well, here is a new actor in the drama. But God says: I reserved him a long time for this hour; and subordinate actors must remain in the dark a long time, for Christ alone is the dramatis persona [main character].

Christian, don’t miss this detail of the burial of Christ—this is not a family matter, but a church matter. A certain Joseph buried Him in the cemetery of the church, and hence the family does not take the leading part in it. Christ had already indicated to his mother that his death was not a family crisis when He said, “Woman, behold thy Son” and pointed her to John. Now Joseph, in the providence of God approaches Pilate before the sun’s setting in order to get permission to bury Jesus. The man privileged with His burial is simply identified as a disciple of Jesus—not a family member, not a representative of the Jews, nor a Roman soldier, but a disciple of Jesus.

Whoever you are, or wherever you are in this world know that Christ did not die for a particular family; He was not buried for a single nation or people group—he died and was buried for the “whole world” (1 John 2:2) and He will redeem His church “out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation” (Revelation 5:9).

“The purpose of our holy and righteous God was to save His church, but their sin could not go unpunished. It was, therefore, necessary that the punishment for that sin be transferred from those who deserved it but could not bear it, to one who did not deserve it but was able to bear it.”—John Owen

Adapted from Klass Schilder, Christ Crucified, 553.


March 31, 2015

Daily Devotionals: (March 31st) Patrick’s Death and Burial

by Aaron Dunlop

Patrick of Ireland: A Devotional History

Reading: “For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better: Nevertheless to abide in the flesh is more needful for you.” Philippians 1:23-24  

There are many things that are beyond our control in life and in death. In life we try to fix what we cannot fix and we tend to get anxious about those things after our death over which we have no control. Patrick knew that when he died his burial might end up being a pagan one, but that it was in the Lord’s hands and he must leave it there. He determined to do that “though I should even go without burial or my body be torn most pitiably limb from limb for dogs or savage beasts to share or the birds of the air devour it” (Confession, sec. 59).

Patrick’s goal was to glorify God, however that might come about, to live and die for and with the people of God: “And if I have ever aimed at any good for my God’s sake, whom I love, I beg Him to grant that I may shed my blood for His name along with those exiles and captives” (Confession, sec. 59). Paul had the same desire for the people of God, saying that to be with God is far better, yet to remain in the flesh was more needful for the church. It was for the church that Paul lived (Philippians 1:24).

Notice also, Christian, that Patrick feared nothing that might hurt the body in pursuing the glory of God. Like Paul he knew that “though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day” and because of this, he did not faint (2 Corinthians 4:16). He says, “It is my strong conviction that if this should happen to me, I would have gained my soul as well as my body; for beyond any doubt in that day we shall rise in the sun’s brilliant light, that is, in the glory of Christ Jesus our redeemer, to be sons of the living God and heirs with Christ and shaped to His likeness; for we shall reign from Him and through Him and in Him” (Confession, sec. 59).

Is this your hope, Christian? What a blessed expectation—a soul redeemed from hell and a body from the grave! “In that day we shall rise in the sun’s brilliant light, that is, in the glory of Christ Jesus our redeemer.” Live in the realisation of this and you will live a “life more abundant!”

“He whose head is in heaven need not fear to put his feet into the grave.”—Mathew Henry

All quotations from the Confession or Letter of Patrick are taken from the edition by A. B. E. Hood, 1978.

April 4, 2013

Daily Devotionals: (April 4th): Christ’s Burial a Church Burial

by Aaron Dunlop

Reading: “And after this Joseph of Arimathaea, being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, besought Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus: and Pilate gave him leave. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus.” John 19:38

And with their eyes fixed on the crucified Christ, a small group of dazed, orphaned, and blinded children crept towards Him whom they had loved, “to pay Him their last respects.” That is the way it is often put, and that is exactly the way it was meant here. To pay respect—the last respect. The friends came together in God’s name for the burial.

The scene was opened by a certain Joseph of Arimathea. It is a mark of the Gospels that figures held in reserve all of a sudden make their appearance. When this happens, people may say: Well, here is a new actor in the drama. But God says: I reserved him a long time for this hour; and subordinate actors must remain in the dark a long time, for Christ alone is the dramatis persona [main character].

Christian, don’t miss this detail of the burial of Christ—this is not a family matter, but a church matter. A certain Joseph buried Him in the cemetery of the church, and hence the family does not take the leading part in it. Christ had already indicated to his mother that his death was not a family crisis when He said, “Woman, behold thy Son” and pointed her to John. Now Joseph, in the providence of God approaches Pilate before the sun’s setting in order to get permission to bury Jesus. The man privileged with His burial is simply identified as a disciple of Jesus—not a family member, not a representative of the Jews, nor a Roman soldier, but a disciple of Jesus.

Whoever you are, or wherever you are in this world know that Christ did not die for a particular family; He was not buried for a single nation or people group—he died and was buried for the “whole world” (1 John 2:2) and He will redeem His church “out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation” (Revelation 5:9).

“The purpose of our holy and righteous God was to save His church, but their sin could not go unpunished. It was, therefore, necessary that the punishment for that sin be transferred from those who deserved it but could not bear it, to one who did not deserve it but was able to bear it.”—John Owen

Adapted from Klass Schilder, Christ Crucified, 553.


March 31, 2013

Daily Devotionals: (March 31st) Patrick’s Death and Burial

by Aaron Dunlop

Patrick of Ireland: A Devotional History

Reading: “For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better: Nevertheless to abide in the flesh is more needful for you.” Philippians 1:23-24  

There are many things that are beyond our control in life and in death. In life we try to fix what we cannot fix and we tend to get anxious about those things after our death over which we have no control. Patrick knew that when he died his burial might end up being a pagan one, but that it was in the Lord’s hands and he must leave it there. He determined to do that “though I should even go without burial or my body be torn most pitiably limb from limb for dogs or savage beasts to share or the birds of the air devour it” (Confession, sec. 59).

Patrick’s goal was to glorify God, however that might come about, to live and die for and with the people of God: “And if I have ever aimed at any good for my God’s sake, whom I love, I beg Him to grant that I may shed my blood for His name along with those exiles and captives” (Confession, sec. 59). Paul had the same desire for the people of God, saying that to be with God is far better, yet to remain in the flesh was more needful for the church. It was for the church that Paul lived (Philippians 1:24).

Notice also, Christian, that Patrick feared nothing that might hurt the body in pursuing the glory of God. Like Paul he knew that “though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day” and because of this, he did not faint (2 Corinthians 4:16). He says, “It is my strong conviction that if this should happen to me, I would have gained my soul as well as my body; for beyond any doubt in that day we shall rise in the sun’s brilliant light, that is, in the glory of Christ Jesus our redeemer, to be sons of the living God and heirs with Christ and shaped to His likeness; for we shall reign from Him and through Him and in Him” (Confession, sec. 59).

Is this your hope, Christian? What a blessed expectation—a soul redeemed from hell and a body from the grave! “In that day we shall rise in the sun’s brilliant light, that is, in the glory of Christ Jesus our redeemer.” Live in the realisation of this and you will live a “life more abundant!”

“He whose head is in heaven need not fear to put his feet into the grave.”—Mathew Henry

All quotations from the Confession or Letter of Patrick are taken from the edition by A. B. E. Hood, 1978.

April 4, 2012

Daily Devotionals: (April 4th): Christ’s Burial a Church Burial

by Aaron Dunlop

Reading: “And after this Joseph of Arimathaea, being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, besought Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus: and Pilate gave him leave. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus.” John 19:38

And with their eyes fixed on the crucified Christ, a small group of dazed, orphaned, and blinded children crept towards Him whom they had loved, “to pay Him their last respects.” That is the way it is often put, and that is exactly the way it was meant here. To pay respect—the last respect. The friends came together in God’s name for the burial.

The scene was opened by a certain Joseph of Arimathea. It is a mark of the Gospels that figures held in reserve all of a sudden make their appearance. When this happens, people may say: Well, here is a new actor in the drama. But God says: I reserved him a long time for this hour; and subordinate actors must remain in the dark a long time, for Christ alone is the dramatis persona [main character].

Christian, don’t miss this detail of the burial of Christ—this is not a family matter, but a church matter. A certain Joseph buried Him in the cemetery of the church, and hence the family does not take the leading part in it. Christ had already indicated to his mother that his death was not a family crisis when He said, “Woman, behold thy Son” and pointed her to John. Now Joseph, in the providence of God approaches Pilate before the sun’s setting in order to get permission to bury Jesus. The man privileged with His burial is simply identified as a disciple of Jesus—not a family member, not a representative of the Jews, nor a Roman soldier, but a disciple of Jesus.

Whoever you are, or wherever you are in this world know that Christ did not die for a particular family; He was not buried for a single nation or people group—he died and was buried for the “whole world” (1 John 2:2) and He will redeem His church “out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation” (Revelation 5:9).

“The purpose of our holy and righteous God was to save His church, but their sin could not go unpunished. It was, therefore, necessary that the punishment for that sin be transferred from those who deserved it but could not bear it, to one who did not deserve it but was able to bear it.”—John Owen

Adapted from Klass Schilder, Christ Crucified, 553.


%d bloggers like this: